[First Ride] Giro Tyrant

[First Ride] Giro Tyrant

05/08/2019
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05/08/2019

Today, Giro launched a new helmet aimed less so at racing and more toward the type of mountain biker who enjoys sessioning in the woods and screwing around with their friends. While this project was driven by style, they made a point to also push the envelope when it comes to safety – after all, loads of riders get hurt just messing around. Anyhow, we got an early jump on testing out the “Tyrant”…

Details

  • 3 sizes: S,M,L
  • 14 Vents
  • MIPS® Spherical
  • Tool-free, bolt-on visor
  • Goggle compatibility
  • Roc Loc® Air DH fit system
  • Spare set of cheek pads included for fit tuning
  • Progressive layering with EPS outer liner and EPP inner liner
  • $150 USD

With 14 vents, the Tyrant isn’t shy about letting air in and out, but it does have quite a bit more material than the average “racy” helmet.

The iconic Roc Loc retention system lives in – at this point it has seen numerous iterations and works quite well, with gloved, muddy or sweaty fingers.

It’s a bit difficult to see, but the new lid uses MIPS new “spherical” design. Basically there are two layers of foam that can slip inside one another. The inner layer is lower density, so it’s easy on your noggin under impact.

The Tyrant offers more rear coverage as well as added protection over the ears. You can still hear your friends heckling, quite well though due to the openings.

Three position adjustability keeps the Roc Loc retention system fitting a great deal of profiles.

The visor is fairly stout –  it’s installed/removed by two tool free, ergonomic thumb screws.

On the trail

Our first ride wearing the Tyrant, suitably, was while we were snapping some photos and filming a bit of riding. While we can see the appeal for that kind of thing as well as hang out sessions, the helmet does run a bit on the warm side. It’s probably not the best choice for huge rides on hot summer days, but alas – that’s not what Giro is marketing it toward. Anyhow, the comfort is top rate with plush padding, accurate sizing and excellent coverage.

We didn’t find any issues with the features…the chin strap is quite comfortable and the length, width, size and shape of the visor was just right. Initially, the ear coverage looked like it might be disconcerting, but was a total afterthought. Fortunately no crashes have been had, but the idea of a softer inner layer seems helpful in that event. Lastly, the channel for the goggle strap not only serves a purpose, but aesthetically it looks quite nice.

Overall

We’ll keep you posted on how the Tyrant works out in the long run, but for the most part, it seems that Giro has managed to fill a niche with a helmet best summed up as being ideal for the 50:01 type crowd. For dirt jump sessions and getting after it in the woods with your buddies, this seems like the perfect lid.

www.giro.com